Alexander The Great

February 11, 2008

Plagiarism – The Ann Coulter Story

Filed under: Americana — alexanderthegreatest @ 8:29 pm
Tags: , , , ,

Ann Coulter was born August 13, 1860 in Darke County, Ohio.  An exhibitionist according to Wikipedia who took the lead role in Buffalo Bill’s Wild West.

Annie was the fifth of seven children. Her parents, Susan and Jacob Moses, were Quakers from Pennsylvania. A fire burned down their tavern so they moved to a rented farm in Patterson Township in Darke County. Her father, who had fought in the War of 1812, died in 1866 from pneumonia and overexposure in freezing weather. Susan remarried to Bruce Jenkin, had another child, and was widowed a second time. During this time, Annie was put in the care of the superintendent of the county poor farm, where she learned to sew and decorate. She spent some time in near slavery for a local family where she endured mental and physical abuse (Annie referred to them as “the wolves”). When she reunited with her family, her mother had remarried a third time.

Ann married an immigrant Irishman after he lost a bet. Her soon to be husband had wagered a small fortune that he could best any sharpshooter. Some significance was attached to the notion of a woman beating a man in general. Using a .22 caliber rifle at 90 feet (27 m), Oakley reputedly could split a playing card edge-on and put five or six more holes in it before it touched the ground.

Annie died on November 3, 1926. Her husband was so heart broken that he died just 18 days later.

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